Snickerdoodle Blondies.

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snickerdoodles. Then a few days later I made something even better:  snickerdoodle blondies.
Which is really saying something because snickerdoodles are one of my least favorite cookies.
But these. These smelled amazing while they were baking, like coffee cake and cinnamon rolls. And they tasted exactly like a cakey snickerdoodle, with a flaky, crackly cinnamon-sugar crust on top that made me want to do dangerous things.
Like serve it warm.
For dinner.

With a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

… and maybe some caramel sauce.

Snickerdoodle Blondies

Printable Recipe

2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
2 cups packed brown sugar
1 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 eggs
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
2 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 teaspoons cinnamon

Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray a 9×13-inch baking pan lightly with cooking spray.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg.

In the bowl of a stand mixer fittted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and brown sugar on medium speed until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition and stopping to scrape the bowl as necessary. Beat in the vanilla.

With the mixer on low, gradually add the flour mixture, beating just until combined. Transfer the dough to the prepared baking pan and spread in an even layer. Combine the granulated sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and sprinkle evenly over the top of the batter.

Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the surface of the blondies spring back when gently pressed. Remove the pan to a wire rack and let the blondies cool completely before cutting.

Source: Brown Eyed Baker.

On average, two restaurants a week closed in the year to the end of March, including casual dining chains, as well as upmarket and independent establishments, according to the latest data from analysts CGA and corporate advisory firm AlixPartners. Graeme Smith, the managing director of AlixPartners, said he expected restaurant numbers to continue to drop throughout the year as large chains in particular slim down. There have already been high-profile closures by burger chain Byron, Jamie’s Italian, Carluccio’s, the Prezzo Group and Sir Terence Conran’s Albion restaurants, but more large chains and independents are expected to suffer. “It’s easy to say this is a crisis in casual dining,” said Peter Martin at CGA. “This is a crisis happening for everyone.” Restaurants are suffering because the fall in the value of the pound since the Brexit vote has made ingredients more expensive while staff costs have risen, partly due to increases in the minimum wage. Economic uncertainty has stalled growth in the sector just as competition has increased after a surge in openings partly fuelled by private equity investment.

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