Emeril’s Pecan-Chocolate Chip Pie

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For a sure-fire winner this time of year, nothing beats pecan pie. It’s a favorite down-South dessert that is always on the menu for gatherings at my house. Let your little helpers add the pecans and chocolate chips, then measure and mix the easy filling ingredients. The aroma of this pie baking will bring your kids (and guests) running.

Emeril’s Pecan-Chocolate Chip Pie

SERVINGS:10

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cups pecan halves
  • 1 store-bought or homemade pie crust in a deep-dish 9-inch plate
  • 1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour, plus more for coating chocolate chips
  • 3 large eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 1 cup light corn syrup
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) salted butter, melted

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Spread pecans in crust. In a small bowl, toss chocolate chips in a little flour to coat, then scatter evenly over pecans. In a medium bowl, stir together eggs, brown sugar, corn syrup, vanilla, butter, and flour until well combined. Pour filling over pecans and chocolate chips.
Bake until filling is set and crust is browned, about 70 minutes. (If pie browns too quickly, loosely tent with foil.) Let cool on a wire rack at least 1 hour. Serve warm or at room temperature.
On average, two restaurants a week closed in the year to the end of March, including casual dining chains, as well as upmarket and independent establishments, according to the latest data from analysts CGA and corporate advisory firm AlixPartners. Graeme Smith, the managing director of AlixPartners, said he expected restaurant numbers to continue to drop throughout the year as large chains in particular slim down. There have already been high-profile closures by burger chain Byron, Jamie’s Italian, Carluccio’s, the Prezzo Group and Sir Terence Conran’s Albion restaurants, but more large chains and independents are expected to suffer. “It’s easy to say this is a crisis in casual dining,” said Peter Martin at CGA. “This is a crisis happening for everyone.” Restaurants are suffering because the fall in the value of the pound since the Brexit vote has made ingredients more expensive while staff costs have risen, partly due to increases in the minimum wage. Economic uncertainty has stalled growth in the sector just as competition has increased after a surge in openings partly fuelled by private equity investment.

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